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Cooking with Guinness

Cooking with Guinness


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If you’re looking to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in the kitchen (without dyeing your food/drink green), then why not cook with Guinness, the most Irish of all beers? Adding alcohol like wine, sherry, and port, to dishes is fairly common and cooking with a rich stout like Guinness is not much different — you just need to know the right way to use it.

Sabrina Sexton, a culinary instructor at The Institute of Culinary Education in New York City, says that, “like any beer, it can be used in a variety of ways, but because of its distinct flavors, it works best with other strong flavors as its intensity tends to overwhelm more subtle ones.” Made with malted barley, Guinness has a noticeable ‘toasted’ quality and a slight bitter finish, which is one of the reasons that it pairs well with nutty Alpine cheeses like Parmigiano-Reggiano. This quality also makes it pair well with strong and salty flavors like ham, beef, lamb, and game meats.

Guinness can be used in a multitude of ways: as a braising liquid, in sauces or stews, or in marinades to add flavor and tenderize the meat. It can also act as a mild levener in breads or other baked goods like this Guinness Cake recipe. Sexton loves using it in a basting liquid or glaze (particularly as a ham glaze), but it also works well for steaming shellfish like shrimp, crabs, or clams.

To balance out the bitterness, she recommends pairing it with sweet things, even in a savory dish (if the bitterness is too pronounced, a small addition of something sweet usually balances it nicely). In particular, ingredients like chocolate, caramel, maple syrup, cream, ginger, and other warm spices. Fruits like apples and pears and root vegetables like carrots, parsnips, and rutabaga also pair nicely with Guinness because of their sweet-earthy taste.

For inspiration, we’ve collected nine recipes that use Guinness in different ways to help you celebrate this Irish holiday in a less green-centric way.

Guinness Braised Beef Short Ribs, Drunken Prunes, Cipollini Onions, and Root Vegetables

Wade Murphy, chef at The Lodge at Donnbeg, in County Clare, Ireland, makes this modern interpretation of traditional meat and potatoes using Guinness as a braising liquid.

In this recipe, Guinness is used to deglaze the pot while scraping up the delicious brown bits on the bottom.

Ratha Chau's Ginger Barbecue Brisket Sandwich

Beer-braised brisket works wonderfully in this deliciously messy sandwich.

Slow Cooker Pork Chops with Guinness and Escarole

This easy recipe uses Guinness for its pleasant pairing with earthy mushrooms.

Boneless Oxtail Braised in Guinness

Sexton says that sometimes, in long-cooking dishes, Guinness' flavor can diminish overtime. If this is a problem, a small splash of it at the end of the cooking will help liven up the flavor.

Triple Chocolate Cookies with Sea Salt and Guinness

Guinness is cleverly used as a glaze for the rich, salty cookies.

A fun way to use Guinness in this adult-version of a root beer float.

A variation on fruitcake that uses Guinness instead of whiskey, rum, or brandy.


Cooking with Guinness: Irish beer adds extra kick to recipes

This dark ruby-colored elixir is enjoyed by millions throughout the world. In fact, more than 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed each day. And on St. Patrick's Day? That number goes up to a staggering 13 million pints.

A common Guinness misconception is that the beer is heavy. In fact, a 12-ounce glass of Guinness has only 125 calories.

And that creamy head? It's the result of a blend of 60% nitrogen to 40% carbon dioxide. A specially designed widget in each Guinness bottle disperses the nitrogen blend upon pouring, creating the famous Guinness head. The deep ruby color of the beer is a result of the roasted barley that goes into it.

The production of Guinness dates back more than 250 years. Founder Arthur Guinness penned one of the great real estate deals of several centuries when he leased the St. James Gate Brewery site in Dublin in 1759. The site was perfect and the price even better. Guinness agreed to pay 45 pounds a year for the property. That's about $75 in U.S. dollars. And the length of the lease? A mere 9,000 years.

Since that time Guinness has become the most popular beer in the world. Today it's brewed in more than 150 countries. Surprisingly, Africa accounts for 40% of the worldwide sales for the brewery.

With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, most folks are thinking of enjoying a pint or two of Guinness at their favorite watering hole. But what one may not be thinking of is incorporating this fine Irish export into a recipe or two to be enjoyed with their St Patty's Day libation.

Beer has become more and more popular as an ingredient in recipes. And Guinness in particular lends itself well to many culinary dishes because of its extra creamy and rich texture.

The first dish that comes to mind when incorporating Guinness into cooking is a traditional Irish stew. One can't go wrong by adding the rich taste of Guinness to a stew filled with tender vegetables smothered in a rich sauce. Top off the dish with a puff pastry crust, complete with a pastry shaped shamrock, and you have a heartwarming meal to start your St. Patrick's Day evening.

Oysters may not be thought of as Irish, but these mollusks are actually found all along the Irish coastline. Known as the European flat oyster, the Irish oyster also played an important role in Irish history, serving as a source of free food during the Irish famine in 1879.

For those looking for something beyond corn beef and cabbage, what about Guinness oysters? Julienne cabbage is tossed with crisp bacon and placed between the oyster and its half shell. Guinness comes into play as an addition to a traditional hollandaise sauce recipe.

And finally, for the chocolate lover, try adding Guinness to your favorite chocolate dessert. Combine Guinness with bittersweet chocolate cake and a cream cheese frosting and you have a dessert your guests will be talking about for days.

From tenderizing beef for a stew, to enhancing the chocolate flavor in your favorite dessert, Guinness is not only the most popular beer in the world it's also a culinary workhorse that can add flavor and depth to some of your favorite recipes. As you share a pint with friends this St. Patrick's Day, remember to save a few so you can create some fabulous Irish-infused culinary delights.

© 2016, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved.


Cooking with Guinness: Irish beer adds extra kick to recipes

This dark ruby-colored elixir is enjoyed by millions throughout the world. In fact, more than 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed each day. And on St. Patrick's Day? That number goes up to a staggering 13 million pints.

A common Guinness misconception is that the beer is heavy. In fact, a 12-ounce glass of Guinness has only 125 calories.

And that creamy head? It's the result of a blend of 60% nitrogen to 40% carbon dioxide. A specially designed widget in each Guinness bottle disperses the nitrogen blend upon pouring, creating the famous Guinness head. The deep ruby color of the beer is a result of the roasted barley that goes into it.

The production of Guinness dates back more than 250 years. Founder Arthur Guinness penned one of the great real estate deals of several centuries when he leased the St. James Gate Brewery site in Dublin in 1759. The site was perfect and the price even better. Guinness agreed to pay 45 pounds a year for the property. That's about $75 in U.S. dollars. And the length of the lease? A mere 9,000 years.

Since that time Guinness has become the most popular beer in the world. Today it's brewed in more than 150 countries. Surprisingly, Africa accounts for 40% of the worldwide sales for the brewery.

With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, most folks are thinking of enjoying a pint or two of Guinness at their favorite watering hole. But what one may not be thinking of is incorporating this fine Irish export into a recipe or two to be enjoyed with their St Patty's Day libation.

Beer has become more and more popular as an ingredient in recipes. And Guinness in particular lends itself well to many culinary dishes because of its extra creamy and rich texture.

The first dish that comes to mind when incorporating Guinness into cooking is a traditional Irish stew. One can't go wrong by adding the rich taste of Guinness to a stew filled with tender vegetables smothered in a rich sauce. Top off the dish with a puff pastry crust, complete with a pastry shaped shamrock, and you have a heartwarming meal to start your St. Patrick's Day evening.

Oysters may not be thought of as Irish, but these mollusks are actually found all along the Irish coastline. Known as the European flat oyster, the Irish oyster also played an important role in Irish history, serving as a source of free food during the Irish famine in 1879.

For those looking for something beyond corn beef and cabbage, what about Guinness oysters? Julienne cabbage is tossed with crisp bacon and placed between the oyster and its half shell. Guinness comes into play as an addition to a traditional hollandaise sauce recipe.

And finally, for the chocolate lover, try adding Guinness to your favorite chocolate dessert. Combine Guinness with bittersweet chocolate cake and a cream cheese frosting and you have a dessert your guests will be talking about for days.

From tenderizing beef for a stew, to enhancing the chocolate flavor in your favorite dessert, Guinness is not only the most popular beer in the world it's also a culinary workhorse that can add flavor and depth to some of your favorite recipes. As you share a pint with friends this St. Patrick's Day, remember to save a few so you can create some fabulous Irish-infused culinary delights.

© 2016, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved.


Cooking with Guinness: Irish beer adds extra kick to recipes

This dark ruby-colored elixir is enjoyed by millions throughout the world. In fact, more than 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed each day. And on St. Patrick's Day? That number goes up to a staggering 13 million pints.

A common Guinness misconception is that the beer is heavy. In fact, a 12-ounce glass of Guinness has only 125 calories.

And that creamy head? It's the result of a blend of 60% nitrogen to 40% carbon dioxide. A specially designed widget in each Guinness bottle disperses the nitrogen blend upon pouring, creating the famous Guinness head. The deep ruby color of the beer is a result of the roasted barley that goes into it.

The production of Guinness dates back more than 250 years. Founder Arthur Guinness penned one of the great real estate deals of several centuries when he leased the St. James Gate Brewery site in Dublin in 1759. The site was perfect and the price even better. Guinness agreed to pay 45 pounds a year for the property. That's about $75 in U.S. dollars. And the length of the lease? A mere 9,000 years.

Since that time Guinness has become the most popular beer in the world. Today it's brewed in more than 150 countries. Surprisingly, Africa accounts for 40% of the worldwide sales for the brewery.

With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, most folks are thinking of enjoying a pint or two of Guinness at their favorite watering hole. But what one may not be thinking of is incorporating this fine Irish export into a recipe or two to be enjoyed with their St Patty's Day libation.

Beer has become more and more popular as an ingredient in recipes. And Guinness in particular lends itself well to many culinary dishes because of its extra creamy and rich texture.

The first dish that comes to mind when incorporating Guinness into cooking is a traditional Irish stew. One can't go wrong by adding the rich taste of Guinness to a stew filled with tender vegetables smothered in a rich sauce. Top off the dish with a puff pastry crust, complete with a pastry shaped shamrock, and you have a heartwarming meal to start your St. Patrick's Day evening.

Oysters may not be thought of as Irish, but these mollusks are actually found all along the Irish coastline. Known as the European flat oyster, the Irish oyster also played an important role in Irish history, serving as a source of free food during the Irish famine in 1879.

For those looking for something beyond corn beef and cabbage, what about Guinness oysters? Julienne cabbage is tossed with crisp bacon and placed between the oyster and its half shell. Guinness comes into play as an addition to a traditional hollandaise sauce recipe.

And finally, for the chocolate lover, try adding Guinness to your favorite chocolate dessert. Combine Guinness with bittersweet chocolate cake and a cream cheese frosting and you have a dessert your guests will be talking about for days.

From tenderizing beef for a stew, to enhancing the chocolate flavor in your favorite dessert, Guinness is not only the most popular beer in the world it's also a culinary workhorse that can add flavor and depth to some of your favorite recipes. As you share a pint with friends this St. Patrick's Day, remember to save a few so you can create some fabulous Irish-infused culinary delights.

© 2016, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved.


Cooking with Guinness: Irish beer adds extra kick to recipes

This dark ruby-colored elixir is enjoyed by millions throughout the world. In fact, more than 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed each day. And on St. Patrick's Day? That number goes up to a staggering 13 million pints.

A common Guinness misconception is that the beer is heavy. In fact, a 12-ounce glass of Guinness has only 125 calories.

And that creamy head? It's the result of a blend of 60% nitrogen to 40% carbon dioxide. A specially designed widget in each Guinness bottle disperses the nitrogen blend upon pouring, creating the famous Guinness head. The deep ruby color of the beer is a result of the roasted barley that goes into it.

The production of Guinness dates back more than 250 years. Founder Arthur Guinness penned one of the great real estate deals of several centuries when he leased the St. James Gate Brewery site in Dublin in 1759. The site was perfect and the price even better. Guinness agreed to pay 45 pounds a year for the property. That's about $75 in U.S. dollars. And the length of the lease? A mere 9,000 years.

Since that time Guinness has become the most popular beer in the world. Today it's brewed in more than 150 countries. Surprisingly, Africa accounts for 40% of the worldwide sales for the brewery.

With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, most folks are thinking of enjoying a pint or two of Guinness at their favorite watering hole. But what one may not be thinking of is incorporating this fine Irish export into a recipe or two to be enjoyed with their St Patty's Day libation.

Beer has become more and more popular as an ingredient in recipes. And Guinness in particular lends itself well to many culinary dishes because of its extra creamy and rich texture.

The first dish that comes to mind when incorporating Guinness into cooking is a traditional Irish stew. One can't go wrong by adding the rich taste of Guinness to a stew filled with tender vegetables smothered in a rich sauce. Top off the dish with a puff pastry crust, complete with a pastry shaped shamrock, and you have a heartwarming meal to start your St. Patrick's Day evening.

Oysters may not be thought of as Irish, but these mollusks are actually found all along the Irish coastline. Known as the European flat oyster, the Irish oyster also played an important role in Irish history, serving as a source of free food during the Irish famine in 1879.

For those looking for something beyond corn beef and cabbage, what about Guinness oysters? Julienne cabbage is tossed with crisp bacon and placed between the oyster and its half shell. Guinness comes into play as an addition to a traditional hollandaise sauce recipe.

And finally, for the chocolate lover, try adding Guinness to your favorite chocolate dessert. Combine Guinness with bittersweet chocolate cake and a cream cheese frosting and you have a dessert your guests will be talking about for days.

From tenderizing beef for a stew, to enhancing the chocolate flavor in your favorite dessert, Guinness is not only the most popular beer in the world it's also a culinary workhorse that can add flavor and depth to some of your favorite recipes. As you share a pint with friends this St. Patrick's Day, remember to save a few so you can create some fabulous Irish-infused culinary delights.

© 2016, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved.


Cooking with Guinness: Irish beer adds extra kick to recipes

This dark ruby-colored elixir is enjoyed by millions throughout the world. In fact, more than 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed each day. And on St. Patrick's Day? That number goes up to a staggering 13 million pints.

A common Guinness misconception is that the beer is heavy. In fact, a 12-ounce glass of Guinness has only 125 calories.

And that creamy head? It's the result of a blend of 60% nitrogen to 40% carbon dioxide. A specially designed widget in each Guinness bottle disperses the nitrogen blend upon pouring, creating the famous Guinness head. The deep ruby color of the beer is a result of the roasted barley that goes into it.

The production of Guinness dates back more than 250 years. Founder Arthur Guinness penned one of the great real estate deals of several centuries when he leased the St. James Gate Brewery site in Dublin in 1759. The site was perfect and the price even better. Guinness agreed to pay 45 pounds a year for the property. That's about $75 in U.S. dollars. And the length of the lease? A mere 9,000 years.

Since that time Guinness has become the most popular beer in the world. Today it's brewed in more than 150 countries. Surprisingly, Africa accounts for 40% of the worldwide sales for the brewery.

With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, most folks are thinking of enjoying a pint or two of Guinness at their favorite watering hole. But what one may not be thinking of is incorporating this fine Irish export into a recipe or two to be enjoyed with their St Patty's Day libation.

Beer has become more and more popular as an ingredient in recipes. And Guinness in particular lends itself well to many culinary dishes because of its extra creamy and rich texture.

The first dish that comes to mind when incorporating Guinness into cooking is a traditional Irish stew. One can't go wrong by adding the rich taste of Guinness to a stew filled with tender vegetables smothered in a rich sauce. Top off the dish with a puff pastry crust, complete with a pastry shaped shamrock, and you have a heartwarming meal to start your St. Patrick's Day evening.

Oysters may not be thought of as Irish, but these mollusks are actually found all along the Irish coastline. Known as the European flat oyster, the Irish oyster also played an important role in Irish history, serving as a source of free food during the Irish famine in 1879.

For those looking for something beyond corn beef and cabbage, what about Guinness oysters? Julienne cabbage is tossed with crisp bacon and placed between the oyster and its half shell. Guinness comes into play as an addition to a traditional hollandaise sauce recipe.

And finally, for the chocolate lover, try adding Guinness to your favorite chocolate dessert. Combine Guinness with bittersweet chocolate cake and a cream cheese frosting and you have a dessert your guests will be talking about for days.

From tenderizing beef for a stew, to enhancing the chocolate flavor in your favorite dessert, Guinness is not only the most popular beer in the world it's also a culinary workhorse that can add flavor and depth to some of your favorite recipes. As you share a pint with friends this St. Patrick's Day, remember to save a few so you can create some fabulous Irish-infused culinary delights.

© 2016, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved.


Cooking with Guinness: Irish beer adds extra kick to recipes

This dark ruby-colored elixir is enjoyed by millions throughout the world. In fact, more than 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed each day. And on St. Patrick's Day? That number goes up to a staggering 13 million pints.

A common Guinness misconception is that the beer is heavy. In fact, a 12-ounce glass of Guinness has only 125 calories.

And that creamy head? It's the result of a blend of 60% nitrogen to 40% carbon dioxide. A specially designed widget in each Guinness bottle disperses the nitrogen blend upon pouring, creating the famous Guinness head. The deep ruby color of the beer is a result of the roasted barley that goes into it.

The production of Guinness dates back more than 250 years. Founder Arthur Guinness penned one of the great real estate deals of several centuries when he leased the St. James Gate Brewery site in Dublin in 1759. The site was perfect and the price even better. Guinness agreed to pay 45 pounds a year for the property. That's about $75 in U.S. dollars. And the length of the lease? A mere 9,000 years.

Since that time Guinness has become the most popular beer in the world. Today it's brewed in more than 150 countries. Surprisingly, Africa accounts for 40% of the worldwide sales for the brewery.

With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, most folks are thinking of enjoying a pint or two of Guinness at their favorite watering hole. But what one may not be thinking of is incorporating this fine Irish export into a recipe or two to be enjoyed with their St Patty's Day libation.

Beer has become more and more popular as an ingredient in recipes. And Guinness in particular lends itself well to many culinary dishes because of its extra creamy and rich texture.

The first dish that comes to mind when incorporating Guinness into cooking is a traditional Irish stew. One can't go wrong by adding the rich taste of Guinness to a stew filled with tender vegetables smothered in a rich sauce. Top off the dish with a puff pastry crust, complete with a pastry shaped shamrock, and you have a heartwarming meal to start your St. Patrick's Day evening.

Oysters may not be thought of as Irish, but these mollusks are actually found all along the Irish coastline. Known as the European flat oyster, the Irish oyster also played an important role in Irish history, serving as a source of free food during the Irish famine in 1879.

For those looking for something beyond corn beef and cabbage, what about Guinness oysters? Julienne cabbage is tossed with crisp bacon and placed between the oyster and its half shell. Guinness comes into play as an addition to a traditional hollandaise sauce recipe.

And finally, for the chocolate lover, try adding Guinness to your favorite chocolate dessert. Combine Guinness with bittersweet chocolate cake and a cream cheese frosting and you have a dessert your guests will be talking about for days.

From tenderizing beef for a stew, to enhancing the chocolate flavor in your favorite dessert, Guinness is not only the most popular beer in the world it's also a culinary workhorse that can add flavor and depth to some of your favorite recipes. As you share a pint with friends this St. Patrick's Day, remember to save a few so you can create some fabulous Irish-infused culinary delights.

© 2016, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved.


Cooking with Guinness: Irish beer adds extra kick to recipes

This dark ruby-colored elixir is enjoyed by millions throughout the world. In fact, more than 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed each day. And on St. Patrick's Day? That number goes up to a staggering 13 million pints.

A common Guinness misconception is that the beer is heavy. In fact, a 12-ounce glass of Guinness has only 125 calories.

And that creamy head? It's the result of a blend of 60% nitrogen to 40% carbon dioxide. A specially designed widget in each Guinness bottle disperses the nitrogen blend upon pouring, creating the famous Guinness head. The deep ruby color of the beer is a result of the roasted barley that goes into it.

The production of Guinness dates back more than 250 years. Founder Arthur Guinness penned one of the great real estate deals of several centuries when he leased the St. James Gate Brewery site in Dublin in 1759. The site was perfect and the price even better. Guinness agreed to pay 45 pounds a year for the property. That's about $75 in U.S. dollars. And the length of the lease? A mere 9,000 years.

Since that time Guinness has become the most popular beer in the world. Today it's brewed in more than 150 countries. Surprisingly, Africa accounts for 40% of the worldwide sales for the brewery.

With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, most folks are thinking of enjoying a pint or two of Guinness at their favorite watering hole. But what one may not be thinking of is incorporating this fine Irish export into a recipe or two to be enjoyed with their St Patty's Day libation.

Beer has become more and more popular as an ingredient in recipes. And Guinness in particular lends itself well to many culinary dishes because of its extra creamy and rich texture.

The first dish that comes to mind when incorporating Guinness into cooking is a traditional Irish stew. One can't go wrong by adding the rich taste of Guinness to a stew filled with tender vegetables smothered in a rich sauce. Top off the dish with a puff pastry crust, complete with a pastry shaped shamrock, and you have a heartwarming meal to start your St. Patrick's Day evening.

Oysters may not be thought of as Irish, but these mollusks are actually found all along the Irish coastline. Known as the European flat oyster, the Irish oyster also played an important role in Irish history, serving as a source of free food during the Irish famine in 1879.

For those looking for something beyond corn beef and cabbage, what about Guinness oysters? Julienne cabbage is tossed with crisp bacon and placed between the oyster and its half shell. Guinness comes into play as an addition to a traditional hollandaise sauce recipe.

And finally, for the chocolate lover, try adding Guinness to your favorite chocolate dessert. Combine Guinness with bittersweet chocolate cake and a cream cheese frosting and you have a dessert your guests will be talking about for days.

From tenderizing beef for a stew, to enhancing the chocolate flavor in your favorite dessert, Guinness is not only the most popular beer in the world it's also a culinary workhorse that can add flavor and depth to some of your favorite recipes. As you share a pint with friends this St. Patrick's Day, remember to save a few so you can create some fabulous Irish-infused culinary delights.

© 2016, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved.


Cooking with Guinness: Irish beer adds extra kick to recipes

This dark ruby-colored elixir is enjoyed by millions throughout the world. In fact, more than 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed each day. And on St. Patrick's Day? That number goes up to a staggering 13 million pints.

A common Guinness misconception is that the beer is heavy. In fact, a 12-ounce glass of Guinness has only 125 calories.

And that creamy head? It's the result of a blend of 60% nitrogen to 40% carbon dioxide. A specially designed widget in each Guinness bottle disperses the nitrogen blend upon pouring, creating the famous Guinness head. The deep ruby color of the beer is a result of the roasted barley that goes into it.

The production of Guinness dates back more than 250 years. Founder Arthur Guinness penned one of the great real estate deals of several centuries when he leased the St. James Gate Brewery site in Dublin in 1759. The site was perfect and the price even better. Guinness agreed to pay 45 pounds a year for the property. That's about $75 in U.S. dollars. And the length of the lease? A mere 9,000 years.

Since that time Guinness has become the most popular beer in the world. Today it's brewed in more than 150 countries. Surprisingly, Africa accounts for 40% of the worldwide sales for the brewery.

With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, most folks are thinking of enjoying a pint or two of Guinness at their favorite watering hole. But what one may not be thinking of is incorporating this fine Irish export into a recipe or two to be enjoyed with their St Patty's Day libation.

Beer has become more and more popular as an ingredient in recipes. And Guinness in particular lends itself well to many culinary dishes because of its extra creamy and rich texture.

The first dish that comes to mind when incorporating Guinness into cooking is a traditional Irish stew. One can't go wrong by adding the rich taste of Guinness to a stew filled with tender vegetables smothered in a rich sauce. Top off the dish with a puff pastry crust, complete with a pastry shaped shamrock, and you have a heartwarming meal to start your St. Patrick's Day evening.

Oysters may not be thought of as Irish, but these mollusks are actually found all along the Irish coastline. Known as the European flat oyster, the Irish oyster also played an important role in Irish history, serving as a source of free food during the Irish famine in 1879.

For those looking for something beyond corn beef and cabbage, what about Guinness oysters? Julienne cabbage is tossed with crisp bacon and placed between the oyster and its half shell. Guinness comes into play as an addition to a traditional hollandaise sauce recipe.

And finally, for the chocolate lover, try adding Guinness to your favorite chocolate dessert. Combine Guinness with bittersweet chocolate cake and a cream cheese frosting and you have a dessert your guests will be talking about for days.

From tenderizing beef for a stew, to enhancing the chocolate flavor in your favorite dessert, Guinness is not only the most popular beer in the world it's also a culinary workhorse that can add flavor and depth to some of your favorite recipes. As you share a pint with friends this St. Patrick's Day, remember to save a few so you can create some fabulous Irish-infused culinary delights.

© 2016, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved.


Cooking with Guinness: Irish beer adds extra kick to recipes

This dark ruby-colored elixir is enjoyed by millions throughout the world. In fact, more than 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed each day. And on St. Patrick's Day? That number goes up to a staggering 13 million pints.

A common Guinness misconception is that the beer is heavy. In fact, a 12-ounce glass of Guinness has only 125 calories.

And that creamy head? It's the result of a blend of 60% nitrogen to 40% carbon dioxide. A specially designed widget in each Guinness bottle disperses the nitrogen blend upon pouring, creating the famous Guinness head. The deep ruby color of the beer is a result of the roasted barley that goes into it.

The production of Guinness dates back more than 250 years. Founder Arthur Guinness penned one of the great real estate deals of several centuries when he leased the St. James Gate Brewery site in Dublin in 1759. The site was perfect and the price even better. Guinness agreed to pay 45 pounds a year for the property. That's about $75 in U.S. dollars. And the length of the lease? A mere 9,000 years.

Since that time Guinness has become the most popular beer in the world. Today it's brewed in more than 150 countries. Surprisingly, Africa accounts for 40% of the worldwide sales for the brewery.

With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, most folks are thinking of enjoying a pint or two of Guinness at their favorite watering hole. But what one may not be thinking of is incorporating this fine Irish export into a recipe or two to be enjoyed with their St Patty's Day libation.

Beer has become more and more popular as an ingredient in recipes. And Guinness in particular lends itself well to many culinary dishes because of its extra creamy and rich texture.

The first dish that comes to mind when incorporating Guinness into cooking is a traditional Irish stew. One can't go wrong by adding the rich taste of Guinness to a stew filled with tender vegetables smothered in a rich sauce. Top off the dish with a puff pastry crust, complete with a pastry shaped shamrock, and you have a heartwarming meal to start your St. Patrick's Day evening.

Oysters may not be thought of as Irish, but these mollusks are actually found all along the Irish coastline. Known as the European flat oyster, the Irish oyster also played an important role in Irish history, serving as a source of free food during the Irish famine in 1879.

For those looking for something beyond corn beef and cabbage, what about Guinness oysters? Julienne cabbage is tossed with crisp bacon and placed between the oyster and its half shell. Guinness comes into play as an addition to a traditional hollandaise sauce recipe.

And finally, for the chocolate lover, try adding Guinness to your favorite chocolate dessert. Combine Guinness with bittersweet chocolate cake and a cream cheese frosting and you have a dessert your guests will be talking about for days.

From tenderizing beef for a stew, to enhancing the chocolate flavor in your favorite dessert, Guinness is not only the most popular beer in the world it's also a culinary workhorse that can add flavor and depth to some of your favorite recipes. As you share a pint with friends this St. Patrick's Day, remember to save a few so you can create some fabulous Irish-infused culinary delights.

© 2016, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved.


Cooking with Guinness: Irish beer adds extra kick to recipes

This dark ruby-colored elixir is enjoyed by millions throughout the world. In fact, more than 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed each day. And on St. Patrick's Day? That number goes up to a staggering 13 million pints.

A common Guinness misconception is that the beer is heavy. In fact, a 12-ounce glass of Guinness has only 125 calories.

And that creamy head? It's the result of a blend of 60% nitrogen to 40% carbon dioxide. A specially designed widget in each Guinness bottle disperses the nitrogen blend upon pouring, creating the famous Guinness head. The deep ruby color of the beer is a result of the roasted barley that goes into it.

The production of Guinness dates back more than 250 years. Founder Arthur Guinness penned one of the great real estate deals of several centuries when he leased the St. James Gate Brewery site in Dublin in 1759. The site was perfect and the price even better. Guinness agreed to pay 45 pounds a year for the property. That's about $75 in U.S. dollars. And the length of the lease? A mere 9,000 years.

Since that time Guinness has become the most popular beer in the world. Today it's brewed in more than 150 countries. Surprisingly, Africa accounts for 40% of the worldwide sales for the brewery.

With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, most folks are thinking of enjoying a pint or two of Guinness at their favorite watering hole. But what one may not be thinking of is incorporating this fine Irish export into a recipe or two to be enjoyed with their St Patty's Day libation.

Beer has become more and more popular as an ingredient in recipes. And Guinness in particular lends itself well to many culinary dishes because of its extra creamy and rich texture.

The first dish that comes to mind when incorporating Guinness into cooking is a traditional Irish stew. One can't go wrong by adding the rich taste of Guinness to a stew filled with tender vegetables smothered in a rich sauce. Top off the dish with a puff pastry crust, complete with a pastry shaped shamrock, and you have a heartwarming meal to start your St. Patrick's Day evening.

Oysters may not be thought of as Irish, but these mollusks are actually found all along the Irish coastline. Known as the European flat oyster, the Irish oyster also played an important role in Irish history, serving as a source of free food during the Irish famine in 1879.

For those looking for something beyond corn beef and cabbage, what about Guinness oysters? Julienne cabbage is tossed with crisp bacon and placed between the oyster and its half shell. Guinness comes into play as an addition to a traditional hollandaise sauce recipe.

And finally, for the chocolate lover, try adding Guinness to your favorite chocolate dessert. Combine Guinness with bittersweet chocolate cake and a cream cheese frosting and you have a dessert your guests will be talking about for days.

From tenderizing beef for a stew, to enhancing the chocolate flavor in your favorite dessert, Guinness is not only the most popular beer in the world it's also a culinary workhorse that can add flavor and depth to some of your favorite recipes. As you share a pint with friends this St. Patrick's Day, remember to save a few so you can create some fabulous Irish-infused culinary delights.

© 2016, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved.



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