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Panera Bread Bans Artificial Additives Including High Fructose Corn Syrup and Trans Fats

Panera Bread Bans Artificial Additives Including High Fructose Corn Syrup and Trans Fats


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Panera is the first fast-casual company to produce a list of more than 150 banned ingredients

Panera joins the ranks of several quick-service restaurants trying to revise their stances on healthy, fresh food.

If you head to your local Panera Bread sometime soon, you’ll see the return of the sandwich and salad chain’s famous summer strawberry poppyseed salad. Panera Bread has become the first national restaurant chain to share a list of 150 banned artificial ingredients that will never appear in any form in any of their menu items. At the top of Panera’s least wanted list are high fructose corn syrup, artificial trans fats, and a whole plethora of artificial sweeteners, colors, flavors, and preservatives.

“We are not scientists. We are people who know and love food, and who believe that the journey to better food starts with simpler ingredients,” Panera Bread CEO Ron Shaich said in a statement. “Simplifying our pantry is essential to our vision, but it is not an end point. We want to be an ally for wellness for the millions of guests we serve each week.”

Panera announced that it has worked with a team of scientists for more than a year to “un-engineer” its menu items in order to find replacements for artificial ingredients. That begins today with the introduction of a whole new line of “clean” salad dressings with no additives from the “no-no list” in sight.

Panera is not the first chain to commit to social health responsibility. Chipotle just announced that they are saying no to GMOs, and the biggest fast food chains are even taking soda off their kids’ menus.


5 Fast Food Chains That Were Trying to Kill You

Popular fast food chains are on a mission to make Americans healthier, one ingredient at a time. Although consumers are constantly on the move and want their food fast, they want real food—food made of wholesome ingredients that people can actually pronounce. John Coupland, a professor of food science at Penn State University told The Guardian, “companies are realizing some ingredients may not be worth their potential harm, given changing attitudes about additives.”

According to Bloomberg Business, the pizza franchise is spending $100 million a year to eliminate artificial ingredients and additives from their menu. So far, they’ve removed “cellulose from the mozzarella cheese, fillers from the sausage, MSG from the ranch dressing, and trans fats from the garlic sauce,” according to TIME. Fourteen ingredients in total will be removed by the end of 2016.

Panera Bread

If you wouldn’t want your son or daughter eating at your restaurant, that’s a pretty good sign that something’s off. Fortunately, Panera Bread’s founder and CEO, Ron Shaich, took this into consideration when remodeling the menu. Shaich told Fortune, “My kids are eating Panera 10 to 11 times a week. I don’t want to serve them junk.” Shaich may have been one of the first CEOs on this mission to serve better ingredients, when he began using chicken raised without the use of antibiotics more than a decade ago. “The company also drew lines in the sand on trans fats, listed calorie information on all menus and, more recently, began to remove artificial additives.”

Taco Bell is one of the most popular fast food chains in America, with items such as the Doritos Locos Tacos and its array of breakfast items. It’s evident they aren’t the healthiest option, but it’s also clear that they’ve jumped on the healthier bandwagon. According to The Guardian, they’re getting rid of artificial colors and flavors. Below are some of the things they plan to remove by the end of the year:

-Blue No 1 (avocado ranch dressing)

-Carmine (red tortilla strips)

Subway is one of the healthier options in the fast food industry, priding themselves on quality ingredients and fresh-baked bread. They’ve made a commitment to remove all artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives from all their sandwiches, salads, cookies, and soups in North America by 2017, according to TIME. So far, they’ve taken out artificial trans fat, high fructose corn syrup, 30 percent of the sodium in the sandwiches, and Azodicarbonamide in the bread. Yeah, we had no idea what that last ingredient was either. According to the FDA, it’s a “chemical substance approved for use as a whitening agent in cereal flour and as a dough conditioner in bread baking.” No bueno.

There’s a reason why Chipotle is always packed and the lines run out the door once it turns 12 pm. Since they opened in 1993, the company says they’ve been commited to finding the best ingredients, respecting animals, farmers, and the environment. They’ve gone even further by removing genetically modified ingredients from their food, “becoming the first major restaurant chain to do so,” per The Wall Street Journal.

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Panera to drop 150 artificial ingredients from its menu

NEW YORK — Good news, Panera Bread will no longer put Tert-Butyl-Hydroquinone in your sandwich.

The difficult-to-pronounce preservative is on a lengthy list of ingredients that the restaurant chain has promised to eliminate from its food by 2016.

Panera said it’s the first national chain to publish a comprehensive list of artificial additives and preservatives that will be removed. The move affects 150 ingredients that the company uses.

“We are not scientists,” said Panera founder and CEO Ron Shaich. “We are people who know and love food, and who believe that the journey to better food starts with simpler ingredients.”

Panera is not the only restaurant company to hop on the healthy food bandwagon.

McDonald’s recently promised to stop using chickens treated with certain antibiotics. Chipotle Mexican Grill has announced plans to cut all genetically-modified foods from its burritos and bowls. And Dunkin’ Donuts has dropped titanium dioxide, an additive used in sunscreen and paints, from its powdered donuts.

The shift comes as consumers have become more aware of the unnatural ingredients used by the fast-food industry and are seeking healthy alternatives.

McDonald’s, once the leading fast-food chain, has been struggling to revive sales as consumers’ tastes have changed. It unveiled a turnaround plan Monday that includes better food made with higher-quality ingredients.

But the trend goes beyond fast food. Even some of the world’s largest food companies have been making changes. Kraft is removing artificial preservatives and synthetic colors from its macaroni and cheese, famous for its bright yellow color. Nestle is now making candy bars without artificial colors and flavors. Coke has removed a chemical used in flame retardant from its drinks.

Erik Olson, a health expert at the Natural Resources Defense Council, applauded Panera’s decision to “eliminate a wide array of chemical additives from its foods.”

“This is part of the company’s quest to address consumer demands and potential health concerns,” Olson said in a statement released by Panera.

Panera is doing away with common additives such as high fructose corn syrup and artificial trans fats. And it’s also dropping artificial colors and flavors, including chemical compounds like azodicarbonamide, methyl cellulose and potassium bromate.

Panera, which has 1,900 restaurants in the United States and Canada, said it has already started eliminating some of the ingredients.

The company also said it would offer new “clean” salad dressings made without artificial flavors or colors.


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NEW YORK — Good news, Panera Bread will no longer put Tert-Butyl-Hydroquinone in your sandwich.

The difficult-to-pronounce preservative is on a lengthy list of ingredients that the restaurant chain has promised to eliminate from its food by 2016.

Panera said it’s the first national chain to publish a comprehensive list of artificial additives and preservatives that will be removed. The move affects 150 ingredients that the company uses.

“We are not scientists,” said Panera founder and CEO Ron Shaich. “We are people who know and love food, and who believe that the journey to better food starts with simpler ingredients.”

Panera is not the only restaurant company to hop on the healthy food bandwagon.

McDonald’s recently promised to stop using chickens treated with certain antibiotics. Chipotle Mexican Grill has announced plans to cut all genetically modified foods from its burritos and bowls. And Dunkin’ Donuts has dropped titanium dioxide, an additive used in sunscreen and paints, from its powdered donuts.

The shift comes as consumers have become more aware of the unnatural ingredients used by the fast-food industry and are seeking healthy alternatives.

McDonald’s, once the leading fast-food chain, has been struggling to revive sales as consumers’ tastes have changed. It unveiled a turnaround plan Monday that includes better food made with higher-quality ingredients.

But the trend goes beyond fast food. Even some of the world’s largest food companies have been making changes. Kraft is removing artificial preservatives and synthetic colors from its macaroni and cheese, famous for its bright yellow color. Nestle is now making candy bars without artificial colors and flavors. Coke has removed a chemical used in flame retardant from its drinks.

Erik Olson, a health expert at the Natural Resources Defense Council, applauded Panera’s decision to “eliminate a wide array of chemical additives from its foods.”

“This is part of the company’s quest to address consumer demands and potential health concerns,” Olson said in a statement released by Panera.

Panera is doing away with common additives such as high fructose corn syrup and artificial trans fats. And it’s also dropping artificial colors and flavors, including chemical compounds like azodicarbonamide, methyl cellulose and potassium bromate.

Panera, which has 1,900 restaurants in the United States and Canada, said it has already started eliminating some of the ingredients.

The company also said it would offer new “clean” salad dressings made without artificial flavors or colors.


Panera to drop 150 artificial ingredients from its menu

NEW YORK — Good news, Panera Bread will no longer put Tert-Butyl-Hydroquinone in your sandwich.

The difficult-to-pronounce preservative is on a lengthy list of ingredients that the restaurant chain has promised to eliminate from its food by 2016.

Panera said it’s the first national chain to publish a comprehensive list of artificial additives and preservatives that will be removed. The move affects 150 ingredients that the company uses.

“We are not scientists,” said Panera founder and CEO Ron Shaich. “We are people who know and love food, and who believe that the journey to better food starts with simpler ingredients.”

Panera is not the only restaurant company to hop on the healthy food bandwagon.

McDonald’s recently promised to stop using chickens treated with certain antibiotics. Chipotle Mexican Grill has announced plans to cut all genetically-modified foods from its burritos and bowls. And Dunkin’ Donuts has dropped titanium dioxide, an additive used in sunscreen and paints, from its powdered donuts.

The shift comes as consumers have become more aware of the unnatural ingredients used by the fast-food industry and are seeking healthy alternatives.

McDonald’s, once the leading fast-food chain, has been struggling to revive sales as consumers’ tastes have changed. It unveiled a turnaround plan Monday that includes better food made with higher-quality ingredients.

But the trend goes beyond fast food. Even some of the world’s largest food companies have been making changes. Kraft is removing artificial preservatives and synthetic colors from its macaroni and cheese, famous for its bright yellow color. Nestle is now making candy bars without artificial colors and flavors. Coke has removed a chemical used in flame retardant from its drinks.

Erik Olson, a health expert at the Natural Resources Defense Council, applauded Panera’s decision to “eliminate a wide array of chemical additives from its foods.”

“This is part of the company’s quest to address consumer demands and potential health concerns,” Olson said in a statement released by Panera.

Panera is doing away with common additives such as high fructose corn syrup and artificial trans fats. And it’s also dropping artificial colors and flavors, including chemical compounds like azodicarbonamide, methyl cellulose and potassium bromate.

Panera, which has 1,900 restaurants in the United States and Canada, said it has already started eliminating some of the ingredients.

The company also said it would offer new “clean” salad dressings made without artificial flavors or colors.


Courtesy of McDonald's

Before permanently rolling out its all-day breakfast menu, McDonald's made the switch from liquid margarine to real butter in September 2015. While margarine is mistakenly known as the healthier version of butter, it actually contains heart-taxing trans fats. Butter, on the other hand, uses one simple ingredient (cream) and sometimes a sprinkle of salt, and contains the added benefit of CLA—a naturally-occurring trans fat that actually helps you torch your midsection. So if you're going for the once-in-a-blue Hotcakes or an Eat This-approved Egg McMuffin, rest assured that Mickey D's smears your b'fast with real butter.


Lucky 7: The food industry's top targets for squeaky clean labels

Clean label is no longer a trend, it’s the rule. Many upstart food companies enter the market with clean label credentials built in, and while legacy brands are under pressure to follow suit, it can be an onerous and expensive endeavor.

Until a few years ago, the onus was on the consumer to check ingredient lists. But as chains such as Panera Bread and Whole Foods released lengthy no-no lists, and even mainstream fast food restaurants like McDonald’s joined the drive toward simpler foods, the push to rid products of artificial colors and flavors, preservatives and high fructose corn syrup while embracing cage-free eggs and antibiotic-free chicken has shifted toward the companies themselves.

So which ingredients are the first to be phased out of products when manufacturers aim to “clean up” their products?

Tamara Barnett, vice president of strategic insights at The Hartman Group, said because the movement is consumer-driven, the ingredients that food and drink makers choose to cut from their products often responds to their demands.

“The answer is really very category specific, which is why it’s hard to come up with a hit list of ingredients,” she told FoodDive.

“Iconic brands walk a fine line. They have built up a food experience but need to meet new perspectives. “A lot of the time consumers already perceive these products as being made with simple ingredients, so shouting from the rooftops that you have taken out the high fructose corn syrup and soy lecithin might be counterproductive.”

Vice President of Strategic Insights at The Hartman Group

Manufacturers of children's products are more likely to have a long list of ingredients to eliminate, including artificial sweeteners, colors, flavors and preservatives – and to give all of them equal importance – while other manufacturers may prioritize unpopular ingredients, such as artificial sweeteners.

Communicating these changes to a shopper used to food looking and tasting a certain way also is a big challenge for established companies.

“Iconic brands walk a fine line. They have built up a food experience but need to meet new perspectives,” said Barnett. “A lot of the time consumers already perceive these products as being made with simple ingredients, so shouting from the rooftops that you have taken out the high fructose corn syrup and soy lecithin might be counterproductive.”

With more consumers than ever saying they prefer simpler foods with easy-to-understand ingredient lists, having a clean label is no longer an optional extra for manufacturers.

Here are the top priority ingredients for food and drink makers, the scale of the challenge and why they have been targeted in clean label reformulations .

Artificial sweeteners

These concerns have led to the rise of natural alternatives , such as stevia and monk fruit, as well as lower sugar products without additional sweeteners or with small amounts of honey or agave syrup. Reformulation in this space has gained momentum as diet soda consumption has fallen by 27% since 2005. Last year was a pivotal one as bottled water overtook soda as the nation’s favorite beverage.

Despite emerging fears about the health impacts of these sweeteners, it has not been enough to convince the American Heart Association or the American Diabetes Association, which continue to approve the use of artificial sweeteners in place of sugar to help manage diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome, to change their stance.

For manufacturers, the taste of natural alternatives is still an issue. PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi has said the best approach could be to nudge down sugar levels over several years instead of unveiling an all-natural, zero-calorie product that doesn’t taste great. Particularly within the beverage industry, blends of sugar and stevia have become increasingly popular. In Europe, Coca-Cola has even reformulated its regular Sprite with 30% less sugar and added stevia, without positioning it as a mid-calorie option.

High fructose corn syrup

High fructose corn syrup was embraced by the industry following its introduction in the 1970s for its advantages as a liquid ingredient, which is easier to use in products like cereals, syrups, sauces and beverages. Comparable to sugar in flavor and sweetness, it also has benefited from U.S. corn subsidies, production quotas on domestic sugar and import tariffs on foreign sugar, making it one of the cheapest available sweeteners. It also has a significant advantage on price where it is about half as costly as ordinary sugar.

According to a recent Hartman Group survey , 56% of U.S. consumers aim to avoid high fructose corn syrup.

Concerns about the ingredient began in 2004 when a study suggested it was linked to rising obesity rates. The study’s lead researcher, Barry Popkin , later said he was wrong to suggest HFCS was uniquely responsible for obesity instead, all fructose-containing sweeteners, including sugar, were likely to blame. The clarification was to no avail. Consumers had already started to shun HFCS en masse, and its reputation has never recovered despite continued assertions from nutrition experts and public health authorities that it is no different from sugar.

For manufacturers who depend on a sweetener for their salad dressings or cereals, they face a dilemma. D o they distance their company from HFCS and switch to sugar, which is often technically challenging as well as more expensive, or maintain the status quo. A large number of brands have gone HFCS-free , including Hunt’s ketchup, Gatorade and Wheat Thins. The effect has been drastic. Annual consumption of HFCS has dropped by about a third , from 62.5 pounds per person in 2000 to 42.5 pounds in 2015, according to Statista.

“Companies are realizing that it’s best to respond to demand. It’s not about trying to convert consumers,” Barnett said. “High fructose corn syrup is more something that’s taken on by the big industry associations. From the manufacturers’ standpoint, it’s about responding to consumer demand both long term and short term … It’s probably (a) better effort to try and modernize your product.”

Trans fats

Trans fats, or partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs), have been used in place of butter and lard for more than 100 years, but its use really took off in the 1980s as the push to cut saturated fat prompted a host of changes. Consumers switched from butter to margarine, and restaurants and fast food outlets stopped using beef fat and palm oil for frying, replacing them with partially hydrogenated oils.

There are significant benefits for manufacturers because PHOs are solid at room temperature, inexpensive and can extend the shelf life of foods. Their melting point between 86°F and 104°F means they melt in the mouth, providing a desirable flaky or creamy texture for products ranging from frosting and chocolates to crackers, cookies and donuts. In the early 2000s, they were found to contribute to “bad” cholesterol in the blood, while also lowering levels of the “good” kind, a factor known to contribute to a higher risk of heart disease.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration responded by requiring all food companies to label trans fats by 2006. Just three years later, American trans fat consumption was a third lower than it was in 1980. While that was a noticeable improvement, most Americans still consume more than the recommended two grams per day. A nationwide ban comes into force next year, making PHO removal an urgent priority for all companies, whether they follow the clean label concept or not.

From a consumer perspective, Barnett said the impending ban meant shoppers were less vigilant about avoiding trans fat “because it’s been handled to a certain extent from a regulation standpoint”.

The health effects of the upcoming nationwide ban could be drastic. In 2007, some counties in New York banned trans fats in restaurants and fast food outlets. The result: heart attacks and strokes were down more than 6% in the counties that had a ban in place compared to those that did not by 2010.

Artificial colors

In 2007, a paper known as t he Southampton Six study linked six artificial food colors and a preservative, sodium benzoate, to hyperactivity in children. It sent shock waves throughout the industry and gave the natural colors sector a major boost. However, international experts found the study to be deeply flawed, and the European Food Safety Authority found no reason to revise its opinion on the safety of the colors.

Despite a large body of research backing their safety, consumers tend to want food that is as real as possible and often choose naturally colored products over artificial ones when they are available.

Natural colors face many challenges , including price fluctuations, availability for raw materials, heat, pH and light stability as well as consumer acceptance of the way the color looks in finished products. In some cases, that can create problems. Candy maker Hershey, for example, has struggled to recreate vibrant reds, greens and other colors that give its Jolly Ranchers hard candies their signature brightness without using artificial colors. Some pigments also may need to be used in much greater volumes than their synthetic counterparts, potentially requiring manufacturers to change their recipes.

But the trend isn’t fading, and 68% of food and beverage products launched in North America from September 2015 to August 2016 used natural colors.

Artificial flavors

The synthetic versions of chemicals that make up flavors tend to be cheaper to produce than naturally sourced alternatives. They also are potentially more eco-friendly because they do not need to be grown and harvested, thereby saving land.

Vanillin, the chemical compound responsible for the taste and smell of vanilla, is one of the most popular flavors in the world — yet it remains one of the scarcest. Extracting the compound from nature, where it occurs in a rare orchid variety, is a lengthy, expensive process. The compound also can be produced in a lab using wood or petroleum. Apart from vanilla beans, which can be subjected to price swings – a shortage pushed prices to $496 a pound last year – flavor firms have found other sources of natural vanillin, including eugenol from clove oil and ferulic acid from rice bran oil.

However, these sources aren’t cheap either and can lead to other challenges. As food companies including Nestle, Hershey, Kellogg and General Mills cut artificial flavors from their products, shortages and high prices for natural flavors are becoming the norm.

“Hershey has had to work very hard to swap out vanillin with real vanilla extract as they moved from something that was a processed ingredient to something that was more variable,” said Barnett. “These ingredients are more difficult to manage.”

Artificial preservatives

More than a third of consumers (35%) think preservatives are the most harmful ingredient for their health , according to a CivicScience poll of more than 4200 consumers in 2015 – a greater proportion than those who chose sugar, saturated fat or sodium.

There are several positives of preservatives in food, most notably preventing bacterial growth and rancidity as well as extending freshness. Consumer health concerns do not appear to be specific to an individual preservative, but rather to the category as a whole. In response, McDonald’s said in 2016 it would remove all preservatives from its chicken nuggets. Clean label meat has become a small but lucrative segment of the overall meat market, according to recent Nielsen data.

“There’s negativity that’s become attached to anything that looks packaged. A lot of the positives of packaged foods, like long shelf life, have kind of become negatives.”

Innovation Insights Director at GlobalData

Nitrates and nitrites are commonly used preservatives in meat products. They give processed meats like bacon, sausages and ham their salty flavor and pink color, but they have been linked to increased cancer risk. Still, the evidence is far from clear. They also occur naturally in vegetables, and people consume far more nitrates and nitrites from these sources. But is it really the research that has caused such backlash among consumers?

“There’s negativity that’s become attached to anything that looks packaged,” Tom Vierhile , i nnovation insights director at GlobalData, told FoodDive. “A lot of the positives of packaged foods, like long shelf life, have kind of become negatives.”

Citric acid, ascorbic acid and rosemary extract are examples of natural preservatives that can be added to food to extend shelf life. Ingredient manufacturers also are exploring the potential of extracts from oregano, onion, grape seed, celery and mushroom. But in terms of both cost and functionality, there is still more work to be done before they are viable alternatives to artificial preservatives.

Gluten

Fewer than 1% of Americans have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes damage to the small intestine when triggered by gluten. Despite the condition being relegated to a small segment of the U.S. population, demand for gluten-free products has skyrocketed, making them a top priority for many food manufacturers.

More than a decade after gluten-free products started to take off, the sector’s staying power – and continued growth – has confounded skeptics. According to research firm Packaged Facts , U.S. sales of gluten-free foods and drinks are projected to exceed $2 billion by 2019, up from an estimated $973 million in 2014.

Food manufacturers including PepsiCo's Quaker division, Snyder's-Lance and General Mills have introduced or reformulated hundreds of products like cookie mixes, cereal, crackers and muffins to be gluten-free or offer gluten-free varieties. It hasn't always been easy. For General Mills, creating gluten-free Lucky Charms and Cheerios was particularly challenging. They were already made with oats, which are naturally gluten-free, but the company had to put in place a special sorting procedure to ensure they were not contaminated with gluten from wheat, rye or barley during harvest or processing.

For manufacturers looking to clean up their products by removing gluten or another ingredient, it is important to consider that consumers aren’t necessarily looking for reformulated foods – they are looking for more natural ones.

“A lot of what companies are trying to do is have pantry-level ingredients that consumers understand. We are in the middle of a generational shift where younger consumers won’t even consider products that seem too much like packaged foods,” Vierhile said. “There is a back to the future approach, a new appreciation for the way things used to be done. Companies are stuck between a rock and a hard place.”


Panera to drop 150 artificial ingredients from its menu

NEW YORK — Good news, Panera Bread will no longer put Tert-Butyl-Hydroquinone in your sandwich.

The difficult-to-pronounce preservative is on a lengthy list of ingredients that the restaurant chain has promised to eliminate from its food by 2016.

Panera said it’s the first national chain to publish a comprehensive list of artificial additives and preservatives that will be removed. The move affects 150 ingredients that the company uses.

“We are not scientists,” said Panera founder and CEO Ron Shaich. “We are people who know and love food, and who believe that the journey to better food starts with simpler ingredients.”

Panera is not the only restaurant company to hop on the healthy food bandwagon.

McDonald’s recently promised to stop using chickens treated with certain antibiotics. Chipotle Mexican Grill has announced plans to cut all genetically-modified foods from its burritos and bowls. And Dunkin’ Donuts has dropped titanium dioxide, an additive used in sunscreen and paints, from its powdered donuts.

The shift comes as consumers have become more aware of the unnatural ingredients used by the fast-food industry and are seeking healthy alternatives.

McDonald’s, once the leading fast-food chain, has been struggling to revive sales as consumers’ tastes have changed. It unveiled a turnaround plan Monday that includes better food made with higher-quality ingredients.

But the trend goes beyond fast food. Even some of the world’s largest food companies have been making changes. Kraft is removing artificial preservatives and synthetic colors from its macaroni and cheese, famous for its bright yellow color. Nestle is now making candy bars without artificial colors and flavors. Coke has removed a chemical used in flame retardant from its drinks.

Erik Olson, a health expert at the Natural Resources Defense Council, applauded Panera’s decision to “eliminate a wide array of chemical additives from its foods.”

“This is part of the company’s quest to address consumer demands and potential health concerns,” Olson said in a statement released by Panera.

Panera is doing away with common additives such as high fructose corn syrup and artificial trans fats. And it’s also dropping artificial colors and flavors, including chemical compounds like azodicarbonamide, methyl cellulose and potassium bromate.

Panera, which has 1,900 restaurants in the United States and Canada, said it has already started eliminating some of the ingredients.

The company also said it would offer new “clean” salad dressings made without artificial flavors or colors.


Panera changing soup to ‘clean’ recipes

What that means: no more artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners or preservatives. Panera reps say they went through 60 different revisions, trying to keep the same flavor.

Panera sells approximately 200 million servings of soup a year, rotating daily between 10 core soups in addition to seasonal favorites including Turkey Chili and Autumn Squash. Broccoli Cheddar is the Company’s top seller. You can see a preview of that soup here.

The company says that common commercial soup ingredients – like hydrolyzed soy and corn protein, maltodextrin and sodium phosphate – no longer appear in any of the Company’s bakery-cafe soups.

Clean Broccoli Cheddar Soup is here! Tweet a #SoupReview for a chance to be in the trailer: https://t.co/nU0NiYEvd5https://t.co/StQdVUkHmr

&mdash Panera Bread (@panerabread) January 6, 2016

The restaurant has been moving toward a more natural menu for months.

Panera said it’s the first national chain to publish a comprehensive list of artificial additives and preservatives that will be removed. They announced that they’re removing a preservative called tert-butyl-hydroquinone last March.

Panera is not the only restaurant company to hop on the healthy food bandwagon.

McDonald’s recently promised to stop using chickens treated with certain antibiotics. Chipotle Mexican Grill has announced plans to cut all genetically-modified foods from its burritos and bowls. And Dunkin’ Donuts has dropped titanium dioxide, an additive used in sunscreen and paints, from its powdered donuts.
The shift comes as consumers have become more aware of the unnatural ingredients used by the fast-food industry and are seeking healthy alternatives.

McDonald’s, once the leading fast-food chain, has been struggling to revive sales as consumers’ tastes have changed. It unveiled a turnaround plan Monday that includes better food made with higher-quality ingredients.

But the trend goes beyond fast food. Even some of the world’s largest food companies have been making changes. Kraft is removing artificial preservatives and synthetic colors from its macaroni and cheese, famous for its bright yellow color. Nestle is now making candy bars without artificial colors and flavors. Coke has removed a chemical used in flame retardant from its drinks.

Erik Olson, a health expert at the Natural Resources Defense Council, applauded Panera’s decision to “eliminate a wide array of chemical additives from its foods.”

“This is part of the company’s quest to address consumer demands and potential health concerns,” Olson said in a statement released by Panera.

Panera is doing away with common additives such as high fructose corn syrup and artificial trans fats. And it’s also dropping artificial colors and flavors, including chemical compounds like azodicarbonamide, methyl cellulose and potassium bromate.

Panera, which has 1,900 restaurants in the United States and Canada, said it has already started eliminating some of the ingredients.

The company also said it would offer new “clean” salad dressings made without artificial flavors or colors.


11 Food Companies Removing Artificial Colors And Flavors By 2018

When you think of nacho cheese from Taco Bell, you probably picture a bright orange color that can really only be manufactured in a lab. That look will soon change, as the fast food chain plans to get rid of the artificial ingredients -- in this case, yellow dye no. 6 -- that cosmetically alter its food.

This kind of menu revamp has been adopted by many fast casual restaurants and big food brands this year. Kraft, Campbell Soup and many others have publicly announced promises to nix artificial ingredients and preservatives from most, if not all, of their edible offerings in the coming years, replacing them with natural alternatives.

The change comes at a time when consumer demand for healthier and more natural ingredients has surged: A 2014 report from the marketing research firm Nielsen showed that more than 60 percent of Americans found the lack artificial colors and flavors an important factor when making food purchases. While there isn't enough evidence to suggest that artificial flavors are harmful, removal is what the people want -- and their desires are being heard. Below, find 11 companies that are making changes to their foods now or in the near future.

The Mexican restaurant pioneered transparency about ingredients for chain restaurants and big food brands. By April 2015, Chipotle successfully removed all GMOs from its foods, the first chain to do so. The company is currently working to improve its tortillas, with hopes of serving them without the dough conditioners they currently contain.

In June, the chain announced that it will be producing tortillas with just four ingredients: whole wheat flour, water, oil and salt. The tortillas are still in the testing stage, but Chipotle is optimistic.



Comments:

  1. Zulkizahn

    No matter how hard I tried, I could never imagine such a thing. How is it possible, I don't understand

  2. Torin

    Accept bad turnover.

  3. Ion

    Yes, I understand you. In it something is also thought excellent, agree with you.

  4. Igorr

    Hi everyone!



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