ie.blackmilkmag.com
New recipes

These Are the Most Popular Neighborhood Destinations for Traveling Food-Lovers

These Are the Most Popular Neighborhood Destinations for Traveling Food-Lovers


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Airbnb is probably the most in-the-know source for where Americans like to vacation. As peer-to-peer vacation home rentals have become more popular, Airbnb put together a list of trending, up-and-coming travel destinations in unexpected neighborhoods around the world. Some of the most popular themes for travelers are urban spaces that aren’t too crowded, cities with greenery, and, of course, places with vibrant dining scenes.

Here are the popular international travel destinations that are growing in popularity thanks to dining-conscious jet-setters:

Milneburg in New Orleans, Louisiana: 1500 percent growth

Kampung Baru in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: 976 percent growth

Fitzroy in Melbourne, Australia: 770 percent growth

Konohana-ku in Osaka, Japan: 609 percent growth

Chutes-Lavie in Marseille, France: 604 percent growth

Rockcliffe Smythe in Toronto, Canada: 497 percent growth

Midtown in Miami, Florida: 430 percent growth

Narvarte in Mexico City, Mexico: 264 percent growth

West Seattle in Seattle, Washington: 230 percent growth

Usera in Madrid, Spain: 228 percent growth

Din Daeng/Huai Khwang in Bangkok, Thailand: 218 percent growth

Chippendale in Sydney, Australia: 204 percent growth

Daehangno in Seoul, South Korea: 203 percent growth

Lyndale in Minneapolis, Minnesota: 193 percent growth

Phoenix Park in Dublin, Ireland: 180 percent growth

Chacarita in Buenos Aires, Argentina: 172 percent growth

Žižkov in Prague, Czech Republic: 103 percent growth

To find out more about these neighborhoods and travel trends, click here.


61 Neighborhood Restaurants That Make the DC Area a Better Place to Eat—and Live

What makes a great neighborhood restaurant? In some ways, it’s easier to pin down what it’s not: a place with a fussy menu, a two-hour line, or really any pretense at all. We gravitate to the spots on this list for the comforting food, sure. But also for things that are easy to overlook in a fast-moving dining scene. A generous welcome. Time-tested reliability. An instant sense of belonging. Here’s to more than 60 restaurants that—for some or all of those reasons—make the city a better place not just to eat but to live. And we need them now more than ever.

22855 Brambleton Plaza, Ashburn

Jason Maddens has a classic chef story: Up-and-comer spends years julienning his way up the high-end kitchen chain. Then decides he’d rather be the boss, quits, and heads back to his hometown to cook the way he really wants. For Maddens, that means an ever-changing menu that some nights features porky ramen, other nights prime rib (one constant: the aïoli-slathered burger). When it’s open, the dining room feels like it’s equal parts date-nighters and parents with iPad-toting kids.


61 Neighborhood Restaurants That Make the DC Area a Better Place to Eat—and Live

What makes a great neighborhood restaurant? In some ways, it’s easier to pin down what it’s not: a place with a fussy menu, a two-hour line, or really any pretense at all. We gravitate to the spots on this list for the comforting food, sure. But also for things that are easy to overlook in a fast-moving dining scene. A generous welcome. Time-tested reliability. An instant sense of belonging. Here’s to more than 60 restaurants that—for some or all of those reasons—make the city a better place not just to eat but to live. And we need them now more than ever.

22855 Brambleton Plaza, Ashburn

Jason Maddens has a classic chef story: Up-and-comer spends years julienning his way up the high-end kitchen chain. Then decides he’d rather be the boss, quits, and heads back to his hometown to cook the way he really wants. For Maddens, that means an ever-changing menu that some nights features porky ramen, other nights prime rib (one constant: the aïoli-slathered burger). When it’s open, the dining room feels like it’s equal parts date-nighters and parents with iPad-toting kids.


61 Neighborhood Restaurants That Make the DC Area a Better Place to Eat—and Live

What makes a great neighborhood restaurant? In some ways, it’s easier to pin down what it’s not: a place with a fussy menu, a two-hour line, or really any pretense at all. We gravitate to the spots on this list for the comforting food, sure. But also for things that are easy to overlook in a fast-moving dining scene. A generous welcome. Time-tested reliability. An instant sense of belonging. Here’s to more than 60 restaurants that—for some or all of those reasons—make the city a better place not just to eat but to live. And we need them now more than ever.

22855 Brambleton Plaza, Ashburn

Jason Maddens has a classic chef story: Up-and-comer spends years julienning his way up the high-end kitchen chain. Then decides he’d rather be the boss, quits, and heads back to his hometown to cook the way he really wants. For Maddens, that means an ever-changing menu that some nights features porky ramen, other nights prime rib (one constant: the aïoli-slathered burger). When it’s open, the dining room feels like it’s equal parts date-nighters and parents with iPad-toting kids.


61 Neighborhood Restaurants That Make the DC Area a Better Place to Eat—and Live

What makes a great neighborhood restaurant? In some ways, it’s easier to pin down what it’s not: a place with a fussy menu, a two-hour line, or really any pretense at all. We gravitate to the spots on this list for the comforting food, sure. But also for things that are easy to overlook in a fast-moving dining scene. A generous welcome. Time-tested reliability. An instant sense of belonging. Here’s to more than 60 restaurants that—for some or all of those reasons—make the city a better place not just to eat but to live. And we need them now more than ever.

22855 Brambleton Plaza, Ashburn

Jason Maddens has a classic chef story: Up-and-comer spends years julienning his way up the high-end kitchen chain. Then decides he’d rather be the boss, quits, and heads back to his hometown to cook the way he really wants. For Maddens, that means an ever-changing menu that some nights features porky ramen, other nights prime rib (one constant: the aïoli-slathered burger). When it’s open, the dining room feels like it’s equal parts date-nighters and parents with iPad-toting kids.


61 Neighborhood Restaurants That Make the DC Area a Better Place to Eat—and Live

What makes a great neighborhood restaurant? In some ways, it’s easier to pin down what it’s not: a place with a fussy menu, a two-hour line, or really any pretense at all. We gravitate to the spots on this list for the comforting food, sure. But also for things that are easy to overlook in a fast-moving dining scene. A generous welcome. Time-tested reliability. An instant sense of belonging. Here’s to more than 60 restaurants that—for some or all of those reasons—make the city a better place not just to eat but to live. And we need them now more than ever.

22855 Brambleton Plaza, Ashburn

Jason Maddens has a classic chef story: Up-and-comer spends years julienning his way up the high-end kitchen chain. Then decides he’d rather be the boss, quits, and heads back to his hometown to cook the way he really wants. For Maddens, that means an ever-changing menu that some nights features porky ramen, other nights prime rib (one constant: the aïoli-slathered burger). When it’s open, the dining room feels like it’s equal parts date-nighters and parents with iPad-toting kids.


61 Neighborhood Restaurants That Make the DC Area a Better Place to Eat—and Live

What makes a great neighborhood restaurant? In some ways, it’s easier to pin down what it’s not: a place with a fussy menu, a two-hour line, or really any pretense at all. We gravitate to the spots on this list for the comforting food, sure. But also for things that are easy to overlook in a fast-moving dining scene. A generous welcome. Time-tested reliability. An instant sense of belonging. Here’s to more than 60 restaurants that—for some or all of those reasons—make the city a better place not just to eat but to live. And we need them now more than ever.

22855 Brambleton Plaza, Ashburn

Jason Maddens has a classic chef story: Up-and-comer spends years julienning his way up the high-end kitchen chain. Then decides he’d rather be the boss, quits, and heads back to his hometown to cook the way he really wants. For Maddens, that means an ever-changing menu that some nights features porky ramen, other nights prime rib (one constant: the aïoli-slathered burger). When it’s open, the dining room feels like it’s equal parts date-nighters and parents with iPad-toting kids.


61 Neighborhood Restaurants That Make the DC Area a Better Place to Eat—and Live

What makes a great neighborhood restaurant? In some ways, it’s easier to pin down what it’s not: a place with a fussy menu, a two-hour line, or really any pretense at all. We gravitate to the spots on this list for the comforting food, sure. But also for things that are easy to overlook in a fast-moving dining scene. A generous welcome. Time-tested reliability. An instant sense of belonging. Here’s to more than 60 restaurants that—for some or all of those reasons—make the city a better place not just to eat but to live. And we need them now more than ever.

22855 Brambleton Plaza, Ashburn

Jason Maddens has a classic chef story: Up-and-comer spends years julienning his way up the high-end kitchen chain. Then decides he’d rather be the boss, quits, and heads back to his hometown to cook the way he really wants. For Maddens, that means an ever-changing menu that some nights features porky ramen, other nights prime rib (one constant: the aïoli-slathered burger). When it’s open, the dining room feels like it’s equal parts date-nighters and parents with iPad-toting kids.


61 Neighborhood Restaurants That Make the DC Area a Better Place to Eat—and Live

What makes a great neighborhood restaurant? In some ways, it’s easier to pin down what it’s not: a place with a fussy menu, a two-hour line, or really any pretense at all. We gravitate to the spots on this list for the comforting food, sure. But also for things that are easy to overlook in a fast-moving dining scene. A generous welcome. Time-tested reliability. An instant sense of belonging. Here’s to more than 60 restaurants that—for some or all of those reasons—make the city a better place not just to eat but to live. And we need them now more than ever.

22855 Brambleton Plaza, Ashburn

Jason Maddens has a classic chef story: Up-and-comer spends years julienning his way up the high-end kitchen chain. Then decides he’d rather be the boss, quits, and heads back to his hometown to cook the way he really wants. For Maddens, that means an ever-changing menu that some nights features porky ramen, other nights prime rib (one constant: the aïoli-slathered burger). When it’s open, the dining room feels like it’s equal parts date-nighters and parents with iPad-toting kids.


61 Neighborhood Restaurants That Make the DC Area a Better Place to Eat—and Live

What makes a great neighborhood restaurant? In some ways, it’s easier to pin down what it’s not: a place with a fussy menu, a two-hour line, or really any pretense at all. We gravitate to the spots on this list for the comforting food, sure. But also for things that are easy to overlook in a fast-moving dining scene. A generous welcome. Time-tested reliability. An instant sense of belonging. Here’s to more than 60 restaurants that—for some or all of those reasons—make the city a better place not just to eat but to live. And we need them now more than ever.

22855 Brambleton Plaza, Ashburn

Jason Maddens has a classic chef story: Up-and-comer spends years julienning his way up the high-end kitchen chain. Then decides he’d rather be the boss, quits, and heads back to his hometown to cook the way he really wants. For Maddens, that means an ever-changing menu that some nights features porky ramen, other nights prime rib (one constant: the aïoli-slathered burger). When it’s open, the dining room feels like it’s equal parts date-nighters and parents with iPad-toting kids.


61 Neighborhood Restaurants That Make the DC Area a Better Place to Eat—and Live

What makes a great neighborhood restaurant? In some ways, it’s easier to pin down what it’s not: a place with a fussy menu, a two-hour line, or really any pretense at all. We gravitate to the spots on this list for the comforting food, sure. But also for things that are easy to overlook in a fast-moving dining scene. A generous welcome. Time-tested reliability. An instant sense of belonging. Here’s to more than 60 restaurants that—for some or all of those reasons—make the city a better place not just to eat but to live. And we need them now more than ever.

22855 Brambleton Plaza, Ashburn

Jason Maddens has a classic chef story: Up-and-comer spends years julienning his way up the high-end kitchen chain. Then decides he’d rather be the boss, quits, and heads back to his hometown to cook the way he really wants. For Maddens, that means an ever-changing menu that some nights features porky ramen, other nights prime rib (one constant: the aïoli-slathered burger). When it’s open, the dining room feels like it’s equal parts date-nighters and parents with iPad-toting kids.